Sacramento State Parking Structure V

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    Sacramento State Parking Structure V project via Dreyfuss+Blackford
  •  Click for Full Screen
    Sacramento State Parking Structure V project via Dreyfuss+Blackford
  •  Click for Full Screen
    Sacramento State Parking Structure V project via Dreyfuss+Blackford
Client
California State University, Sacramento
Location
Sacramento, California
Completion
2017

Located by the main entrance to the Sacramento State campus, Parking Structure V is designed to blend and complement the dense trees of the nearby arboretum. Replacing an existing surface lot, the 1,750 stall, six-level parking structure serves a campus in dire need of parking, and provides a structure exceeding the quality and efficiency of any of the previous parking facilities.

The structure’s skin creates a dialog with the surrounding trees. Combined with columnar trees, the facade is dressed with vertical fins painted in tints of green. The thousands of individual square fins are a digital representation of nature, and form patterns like leaves of a tree canopy overhead. Covering the three upper levels of the structure, precast concrete is textured with a pattern that nods to the rough bark of the birch trees in the adjacent arboretum.

Serving a sizable percentage of the campus’ parking need, automobile circulation is designed to move traffic into the structure as efficiently as possible with queuing space off-street to handle periods of high volume. Taking advantage of Clark Pacific’s Total Precast architectural concrete system, the design quality and level of material finish is second to none. Because of the increased erection speed possible with the precast solution, the overall project schedule is more aggressive and intended to be complete over a single school semester.

The technology, design, innovations, placemaking and conservation programs implemented at Parking Structure V allow it to achieve Parksmart  Gold certification by the Green Building Certification Institute for the U.S. Green Building Council, making it the highest-performing, most-sustainable parking structure on campus.